Stapled Wires and Arc Fault Breakers and Why We Need Them

Lets talk stapled wires, why is it code to staple wires and what happens when the staple goes through the wire?

Cables are typically secured with cable staples or with stacker devices that secure multiple cables in one location. There are a few important rules to follow when choosing and installing staples and other cable fasteners:

  • Use the proper size of fastener for the size and number of cables being secured.
  • Use insulated staples and fasteners. Avoid plain metal staples, and never use standard staples or other fasteners that are not designed for electrical installations.
  • Position cables flat against framing before securing them; do not fasten cables on-edge.
  • Secure cables snugly but not so tightly that the cable is damaged or indented from the fastener.
  • Use stacker-type fasteners to secure multiple cables to the same framing member. These allow the cables to be stacked for a neater, safer installation. The clips are either nailed or screwed to the framing, and the cables are secured by clipping them into the slots.
  • Avoid sharp bends in the cable immediately after a box, a drilled hole, or a staple or clip. Cables must not be bent in a radius smaller than 5 times the cable diameter.

Arc Fault Breakers, why do we need them?

Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters or also known as AFCI, is a circuit breaker that is designed to sense an arc, which is an electrical “leak” often caused by damaged or deteriorating wires and cords that can cause a fire.

Now don’t forget about GFCI or also known as Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters which monitors the electricity flowing in a circuit. This device reduces the risk of electrical shock by shutting off the electric power circuit when it detects that current is flowing an unintended path, such as water or a person.

So basically you need these breakers to live in a safe environment.

 

Disclaimer:  This is an informational blog only, always hire a licensed insured electrical contractor to work on your home or business.

Burnt Wires

Well I came across another burnt up wire today.  This was to a dryer it appears durning construction the electrician didn’t tighten the terminal down enough and over time it became loose.   When this happens corrosion will build up and over time this will cause more resistance and this causes heat, then you end up with burnt and damaged wires at the least. In this case it burnt out the side of the plug and caused damage to the box as well the box did its job it contained the fire damage but it was no longer usable.

So to fix this- the wire had allot of damage I cut in a new box below this old one because the conductors fed up from below this gave me more length to work with and I was able to cut out all of the damaged conductors to get to clean copper and good insulation. Then I installed the new plug (in this case we up graded to a 4 wire dryer plug and we replaced to dryer cord as well) we then proceeded to test the plug then the machine everything was back to normal and working correctly.

If you look close you can also see the damage to the box the top right its sagging down and no longer has the correct protection to use for Electrical at all.

Disclaimer:  This post was meant as an informational post.  As always, have a licensed insured electrician work on your home.